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Anthropology Mentors

Anthropology Skills and Knowledge Mentorship Program

If you have a question about anthropology…. …then just ASK!

Anthropology Skills and Knowledge is a mentorship program where graduate students volunteer their time to answer questions that undergraduate students may have about anthropology.  Our mission is to help undergraduates students achieve their academic goals by sharing our own experiences and providing an informal discussion forum where undergraduates can connect with graduate students and faculty members.  In addition to learning about opportunities in the anthropology program at McMaster, members of ASK can also help with:

 • preparing a CV  • getting letters of reference  • how to apply for graduate studies
 • volunteering  • jobs in anthropology  • external grants (OGS, SSHRC)
 • publishing  • scholarships  • independent studies
 • internships  • research opportunities  • conferences

Check out the mentor profiles below and feel free to contact anyone of us with your questions, and if someone’s research or expertise sounds interesting to you….then just ASK


Nadia Densmore, PhD Candidate
Hons. BA Anthropology (McMaster University)Nadia
densmone@mcmaster.ca

ASK Key words: Zooarchaeology;  Mortuary archaeology; Graduate school applications; Project organization/scheduling

While I enjoy hearing about many aspects of anthropology my specific areas of interest are in the archaeology of identity and death, and zooarchaeology. I have been working with fish fauna collections for the last couple of years, from both the Northwest Coast of North America and the South Pacific regions. I think that it is important for students who are interested in pursuing graduate studies to have someone that they can talk to, in an individual and comfortable setting. Often undergraduates only interact with graduate students as Teaching Assistants, which does not necessarily make the personal connection that a mentorship does. It is important to be able to talk about any potential fears or concerns you are experiencing over going to grad school and I think that this program allows undergraduate students to make the connections with graduate students that they choose to make academically and personally. I would be happy to address questions about the stresses graduate students encounter outside of their projects. As well as any questions students have about faunal studies in Archaeology, or laboratory based projects more generally. I would also like to talk about how you choose a school, and what makes a truly informed choice about where to pursue graduate studies.
 

Allee Holland, PhD Candidate
Holland
jaagumae@mcmaster.ca

ASK Key words: grad school applications, preparing a CV, scholarships, grants (both SSHRC and CIHR), conferences, finding field schools, historic archaeology, bioarchaeology, osteology, medical anthropology, food and nutrition, non-academic archaeology jobs

My research draws on biological, medical and nutritional anthropology to investigate the relationship between perceptions of the chronic disease osteoporosis and nutrition choices in young adults. I use a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods to explore how ideas of osteoporosis risk are developed by young adults and how they are applied to decisions about food and nutrition. While my PhD research concerns the intersection between food and disease, I have a Master's in bioarchaeology that focused on paleopathology in ancient Inca skeletal remains using digital imaging. I have worked on a number of archaeological sites in North America and Europe, both as an archaeologist and as a biological anthropologist. Additionally, I have worked as a contract archaeologist in Ontario for the past 3 years. I have experience in a number of different areas and would be happy to speak with students about archaeology, biological  or medical anthropology. I routinely present at conferences and have participated in a number of field schools so I would be pleased to pass along my experiences. I am interested in mentoring students because I was mentored by a graduate student when I was an undergraduate and I found the experience to be extremely helpful.

Madeleine Mant, PhD Candidate
Hons. BA Anthropology (University of Alberta)Mant
MSc Palaeopathology (Durham University, UK)
mantml@mcmaster.ca

ASK Key words: Museology, Palaeopathology; Osteology; Graduate school applications (UK); Funding applications; Canadian history

My research is concerned with the identification of perimortem trauma- injuries occuring around the time of death-in archaeological skeletal remains. I seek to more readily identify perimortem trauma by studying the skeletal remains of individuals from 19th Century London, UK. I am interested in the biocultural context, coupling the study of skeletal remains with their cultural and historical background. I worked as a historical interpreter and researcher, and can give insight into the process of archival research and oral interviews.  I am interested in mentoring undergraduates because I benefited from the advice of higher-level students throughout my undergraduate years and hope to pass some of my experience along! I would be particularly happy to discuss questions regarding postgraduate studies in the UK. I participated in a cemetery excavation field school in Poland and, having just gone through the process myself, would be pleased to discuss graduate school and funding applications.

 

Priscilla Medeiros, PhD Candidate
MedeirosBA Anthropology (McMaster University)
MA Medical Anthropology (University of New Brunswick)
medeirp@mcmaster.ca

ASK Key words: Volunteering, graduate school applications, conferences, applying for scholarships (OGS, CIHR).

My research interests within Medical Anthropology include globalization, gender and sexuality, global health systems, cross-cultural assessment, illness narratives, and the social/political dimensions of HIV/AIDS. My PhD dissertation will examine the recent changing paradigm of HIV/AIDS policy through the perspective of community-based HIV agencies and women living with HIV-AIDS in Atlantic Canada. Specifically, my work will document the needs of women to evaluate how policy changes are affecting their well-being. I have experience volunteering with a number of community-based organizations, actively participating in conferences, and working as a TA. As an undergraduate student, I benefited from peer mentoring programs and look forward to sharing my knowledge on the topics outlined in the preceding ASK list.


Daina Stanley, PhD Candidate
Hons. BA (Anthropology & Criminology), MA (Anthropology) University of Ottawa


ASK Key words: Graduate school applications, conferences, preparing a CV, funding applications, reviewer and editorial experience

My research interests, broadly speaking, include medical anthropology, public health, community-based research, prison ethnography, health and illness, care and caregiving, morality and prisoners. My PhD dissertation will centre on prisoners' engagement with caregiving in a maximum-security hospice in California. I will draw on ethnographic methods to explore the connection between discipline and care, the formation of moral personhood in prison, and the kinds of moral prisoners within prison walls. I have worked as a community-based researcher, a clinical research assistant and a teacher's assistant. I also have experience working as both an editor and a reviewer for peer-reviewed journals and have presented at several conferences. I would be happy to share my insights and experiences and to answer any questions.


Lauren Wallace, PhD CandidateLauren Wallace ASK Mentor
Hons. BAS (Bachelor of Arts and Science), University of Guelph, MA Anthropology (McMaster University)
wallalj@mcmaster.ca

ASK Key words: Medical Anthropology, Public Health, Applying to Graduate School, Publishing, Conferences, Applying for Scholarships (OGS, CIHR)

My Master's approaches health research using community-based participatory methods. I will work in the Upper East Region of Ghana in collaboration with the Navrongo Health Research Centre on a health issue identified by the community. During my undergraduate degree I was involved in a few different research projects, including public health research in Ghana and nutritional research in Cambodia. I benefited extensively from having student mentors during my undergraduate degree. I would be particularly interested in mentoring students who are completing graduate school applications, which I realize can be a daunting process.

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